Rumpler

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Rumpler

Rumpler Flugzeugwerke, usually known simply as Rumpler was a German aircraft manufacturer founded in Berlin by Austrian engineer Edmund Rumpler in 1909 as Rumpler Luftfahrtzeugbau.

Rumpler D.I

The Rumpler D.I (factory designation 8D1) was a fighter-reconnaissance aircraft produced in Germany at the end of World War I.

Rumpler 6B

The Rumpler 6B was a German single-engine floatplane fighter with a biplane wing structure, designed and built by Rumpler Flugzeugwerke, in Berlin Johannisthal and introduced in 1916.

Rumpler G.I

The Rumpler G.I was a bomber aircraft produced in Germany during World War I, together with refined versions known as the G.II and G.III.

Rumpler C.VII

The Rumpler C.VII was a military reconnaissance aircraft built in Germany during World War I. It was developed from the C.IV and optimised for high-altitude missions that would allow it to operate at heights that would render it immune to interception by enemy fighters.

Rumpler C.IV

The Rumpler C.IV was a German single-engine, two-seat reconnaissance biplane. The C.IV was a development of C.III with different tail surfaces and using a Mercedes D.IVa engine in place of C.III's Benz Bz.IV.

Rumpler B.I

The Rumpler B.I (factory designation 4A) was a military reconnaissance aircraft produced in Germany during World War I.

Rumpler C.III

The Rumpler C.III (factory designation 6A5) was a biplane military reconnaissance aircraft built in Germany during World War I.

Rumpler C.I

Entering service in 1915, the Rumpler C.I, company designation 5A 2, two-seater single-engine reconnaissance biplane, was one of the first German C-type aircraft, and also one of the longest serving in its class during World War I, being retired from the last front line units only in early 1918.

Rumpler C.VIII

The Rumpler C.VIII was a German single-engine biplane advanced trainer manufactured by Rumpler Flugzeugwerke, in Berlin Johannisthal in 1917.