NAG

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Nag

Nag or NAG may refer to:

Nagaland

Nagaland is a state in Northeast India. It borders the state of Assam to the west, Arunachal Pradesh and Assam to the north, Myanmar to the east, and Manipur to the south.

Nagpur

Nagpur is the winter capital, a sprawling metropolis, and the third largest city of the Indian state of Maharashtra after Mumbai and Pune.

Nagoya

Nagoya (名古屋) is the largest city in the Chūbu region of Japan. It is Japan's third-largest incorporated city and the fourth-most-populous urban area.

Nagorno-Karabakh War

The Nagorno-Karabakh War was an ethnic and territorial conflict that took place in the late 1980s to May 1994, in the enclave of Nagorno-Karabakh in southwestern Azerbaijan, between the majority ethnic Armenians of Nagorno-Karabakh backed by the Republic of Armenia, and the Republic of Azerbaijan.

Nagasaki

Nagasaki (長崎市, Nagasaki-shi, Japanese: [naɡaꜜsaki]) ( listen ) is the capital and the largest city of Nagasaki Prefecture on the island of Kyushu in Japan.

Nagorno-Karabakh

Nagorno-Karabakh ( nə-GOR-noh kar-ə-BAHK), meaning "Mountainous Karabakh," also known as Artsakh, is a landlocked region in the South Caucasus, within the mountainous range of Karabakh, lying between Lower Karabakh and Zangezur, and covering the southeastern range of the Lesser Caucasus mountains.

Naga, Camarines Sur

Naga, officially the City of Naga (Central Bikol: Ciudad nin Naga; Rinconada Bikol: Syudad ka Naga; Filipino: Lungsod ng Naga; Spanish: Ciudad de Naga), or known simply as Naga City, is a 2nd class independent component city in the Bicol Region, Philippines.

Naga people

The Naga people (pronounced [naːgaː]) are an ethnic group conglomerating of several tribes native to the North Eastern part of India and north-western Myanmar (Burma).

Nagoya Castle

Nagoya Castle (名古屋城, Nagoya-jō) is a Japanese castle located in Nagoya, central Japan. During the Edo period, Nagoya Castle was the heart of one of the most important castle towns in Japan, Nagoya-juku, which was a post station on the Minoji road linking two of five important trade routes, the Tōkaidō and the Nakasendō.